Bola expuesta en el Museo del Traje con el diseño de

Open by Design

(Museo del Traje)

The psychedelic 60s and the Space Age: the essence of an exceptional industrial design exhibition to celebrate the Madrid Design Festival.

Every February, Spain’s capital transforms into a great showcase of international design. Exhibitions, talks, workshops and other activities related to design in all its variations give life to the Madrid Design Festival. The streets are bedecked in beautifully designed posters promoting events with cutting-edge creators and exhibitions that prompt us to reflect on the value of design.

In this inspiring context, Madrid’s Museo del Traje (Fashion Museum) invited us to design the visuals for the exhibition ‘Open by Design: Industrial Design and Urban Product in the 60s’ – displaying pieces from its Ethnological Heritage Research Centre, including televisions, lamps, furniture and graphic design posters.

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About Museo del Traje

Madrid’s Museo del Traje boasts almost 30,000 attire pieces, ranging from medieval fashion and costumes to garments by some of Spain’s most exciting contemporary fashion designers.

Cajas de cerillas con recreación de los años 60 expuestas en el Museo del Traje con motivo del Madrid Design Festival de 2020. Identidad corporativa diseñada por Cocota Studio
Decoración del interior del Museo del Traje con motivo del Madrid Design Festival de 2020 con motivos de los años 70. Imagen de marca diseñada por Cocota Studio
Design of exhibition poster
Decoración del interior del Museo del Traje con motivo del Madrid Design Festival de 2020 con recreación de los años 60. Identidad corporativa diseñada por Cocota Studio
Fósforos del Pirineo matchboxes by Cruz Novillo + Olmos

The exhibition addresses the liberalisation of design in the 60s, a period influenced by major historic, social and cultural changes. One of the highlights of this period was the Apollo 11 moon landing, which influenced the design of everyday objects like televisions. This led us to pick the iconic Videosphere television set, created in 1970 in Japan and inspired by this historic achievement, as the leading piece for the exhibition poster. This object is a clear example of the democratisation of design and the opening of international exchange initiated in the 60s, breaking away from the functional and austere aesthetics of previous decades.

Other delightful pieces included the iconic Brionvega radio by Richard Sapper and Marco Zanuso, the Estudios DG lamp created by Eduardo Duque, and the Fósforos del Pirineo matchboxes by Cruz Novillo + Olmos. Needless to say, we had a blast.

Decoración dentro del Museo del Traje con motivo del Madrid Design Festival de 2020, imagen de marca diseñada por Cocota Studio
Introductory panel
Decoración con motivos de los años 70 del interior del Museo del Traje para el Madrid Design Festival de 2020, imagen de marca diseñada por Cocota Studio
Re-creation of mid-60s urban family house
Decoración dentro del Museo del Traje con motivo del Madrid Design Festival de 2020, imagen de marca hecho por Cocota Studio
‘Télé Portable’ TV designed in France in 1960
Cartel con el lema "abierto por diseño" expuesto en una pared la calle por el Museo del Traje. Diseño de marca hecho por Cocota Studio para el MDF de 2020
Outside banner
Cartel con el lema "abierto por diseño" expuesto en la calle por el Museo del Traje. Diseño de marca hecho por Cocota Studio para el Madrid Design Festival de 2020
Street display with exhibition image
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